NEW RELEASE: The Ribnitzer Rebbe

The Ribnitzer Rebbe

Tammuz was a rainy, cloud-filled  month that year in Chicago. The Ribnitzer Rebbe, who had traveled to Chicago for a wedding, wanted to say Kiddush Levanah, but as the days passed, the sky remained cloudy, and the moon could not be seen. It was one of the last nights on which Kiddush Levanah could still be said for Tammuz. The Rebbe stood outside with a small group of men, trying to catch a glimpse of the moon—but it was simply not visible.

The Rebbe called over his gabbai. “Please take this towel and dip it into the mikveh,” he instructed.

When the gabbai returned with the wet towel, the Rebbe thanked him, took the towel, and flicked it several times toward the sky. Suddenly the clouds parted in the sky, and the moon appeared, shining brightly.

The Rebbe was able to recite Kiddush Levanah.

True story. I know, because that wedding in Chicago, for which the Ribnitzer Rebbe had traveled to the Windy (and cloudy) City, was that of my parents, and I’d heard this amazing story a few times from them.

Though you’d probably have believed the story even without this personal add-on—because, after all, we’re talking about the Ribnitzer Rebbe here, the tzaddik for whom mofsim and miracles were commonplace.

Now you can read an entire book about the Ribnitzer Rebbe’s greatness and the miracles he helped bring about! The Ribnitzer Rebbe was authored by a close chassid and confidant of the Rebbe, Rabbi Avraham (Romi) Cohn, who witnessed firsthand many of the eye-popping “miracle worker” stories that he relates.  In addition to the memories, anecdotes, and lessons written about in this book, it also  includes many photos, as well as a synopsis of the Rebbe’s early years in the USSR.

Prepare to be mesmerized by The Ribnitzer Rebbe. Prepare to be inspired.

Click here to purchase online.

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